Alopecia Areata

Alopecia Areata: Can’t be cured But it can be prevented

Alopecia Areata is an autoimmune disease that causes hair loss.

Alopecia areata does not cause complete baldness but instead results in round patches of hair loss on the scalp and other parts of the body.

Alopecia areata cannot be predicted by family history or genetics alone, however, it can run in families.

Alopecia areata affects both sexes equally but 8 out of 10 people who have Alopecia Areata are between the ages of 10 and 30 – although Alopecia can strike at any age.

The exact cause of Alopecia Areata is unknown, however, it may occur when your body mistakenly attacks its own hair.

Alopecia areata is not contagious and cannot be spread from person to person.

Alopecia Areata can also cause Alopecia Totalis (complete loss of hair on the head and face) and Alopecia Universalis (complete loss of hair on the head, face, body).

Alopecia areata usually results in round patches of smooth, shiny baldness that may be slightly raised.

Your skin within these patches remains healthy but there’s no way to predict how much – if any – regrowth will take place over time.

Alopecia areata affects both men and women equally but 8 out of 10 people who have Alopecia Areata are between the ages of 10 and 30 Alopecia Areata may be caused by a combination of factors.

Alopecia Areata can also cause Alopecia Totalis (complete loss of hair on the head and face) and Alopecia Universalis (complete loss of hair on the head, face, and body).

Alopecia Areata usually results in round patches of smooth, shiny baldness that may be slightly raised.

Your skin within these patches remains healthy but there’s no way to predict how much – if any – regrowth will take place over time. Alopecia areata is not contagious and cannot be spread from person to person.

Can your hair grow back if you have alopecia?

Yes. Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease that affects hair follicles, causing round patches of hair loss on the scalp. Alopecia is Latin for “baldness” and areata means “marked with spots.”

While Alopecia is not curable, it can be controlled with medication prescribed by your doctor called corticosteroids.

The first sign is typically patchy hair loss which may resemble dandruff or a rash on the scalp. The affected hairs turn white and fall out.

Alopecia can affect African-Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and individuals of Mediterranean descent.

Alopecia can be associated with other autoimmune diseases such as thyroid disease and vitiligo (loss of skin color).

Alopecia has also been linked to other medical conditions, including lupus, diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis.

Although Alopecia itself is not a life-threatening condition, it can be psychologically damaging to people who lose their hair.

Alopecia often affects self-esteem and causes anxiety and depression in some individuals — especially if they were bald or balding prematurely in childhood or teenage years.

Alopecic patients may experience social withdrawal because of self-consciousness about their appearance.

Alopecia areata should not affect your overall health, since Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disorder.

Alopecia is not the cause of other health problems or a disease in itself. Alopecia can afflict anyone at any age.

It is important to note that Alopecia areata does not affect your general health status.

Alopecia does not indicate that you have cancer or pose a serious threat to your health.

Alopecia areata is not hereditary, so neither your children nor any other relatives will be at risk of developing Alopecia areata. Alopecic patches are generally smaller than two inches in diameter.

Alopecia can also occur on the beard area in men, and on the scalp or hairline in women. Alopecic patches can appear anywhere on the body where hair grows.

How is Alopecia diagnosed?

Diagnosis of Alopecia usually involves a clinical examination and taking a medical history. Alopecic patches are generally smaller than two inches in diameter.

Alopecia can also occur on the beard area in men, and on the scalp or hairline in women. Alopecic patches can appear anywhere on the body where hair grows.

How is Alopecia treated?

Some Alopecia patients see regrowth within three months, whereas others may not notice any results for up to one year.

Although success varies from person to person, your chances for recovery increase if you: continue with treatment (keep applying for this medicine even if you don’t see immediate results), apply for the medicine as directed, and avoid shampooing and wearing tight hairstyles that can irritate Alopecia patches.

There is no permanent cure for Alopecia, but regrowth of hair may occur when treatment begins early enough before Alopecia has scarred the skin and destroyed a significant amount of hair follicles.

Alopecia causes almost no detectable physical symptoms, so you will not feel pain or any other discomfort from Alopecia.

What foods are good for alopecia?

There are several things that have been shown to help Alopecia including vitamin A, zinc supplements, aloe vera gel, ultrasound therapy, and steroid injections into Alopecic patches.

What can cause alopecia areata to get worse?

If you have Alopecia areata, your hair loss may not get better on its own. Alopecia areata has no known cure, so it may always be a part of your life. But there are ways to manage it so you don’t experience more hair loss or other symptoms.

If Alopecia areata isn’t treated, the condition may progress and affect more areas of the body until your whole scalp is bald.

Alopecia areata can sometimes be triggered by an illness or certain medicines, including beta-blockers.

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